Prince Dies at 57 – Purple Rain Now Purple Tears as the Doves Cry


Reprint from CNN – April 21, 2016

The artist known as Prince, who pioneered “the Minneapolis sound” and took on the music industry in his fight for creative freedom, died Thursday [April 21, 2016] at age 57.

“It is with profound sadness that I am confirming that the legendary, iconic performer, Prince Rogers Nelson, has died at his Paisley Park residence this morning at the age of 57,” said his publicist Yvette Noel-Schure.

Earlier Thursday, police said they were investigating a death Paisley Park studios in Chanhassen, Minnesota.

There is a massive outpouring of grief on social media. Some are saying the icon’s death is what it sounds like when doves cry, a reference to his monster hit.

(Continue article below the photo gallery)


In early April, Prince said he wasn’t feeling well, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, and canceled at least one concert in the city. Some days later, he took the stage in Atlanta to perform. After that concert, the singer’s plane made an emergency landing, Noel-Schure told CNN. At the time she said, “He is fine and at home.”

Prince has won seven Grammy Awards, and has earned 30 nominations. Five of his singles have topped the charts and 14 other songs hit the Top 10. He won an Oscar for the original song score to the classic film “Purple Rain.”

The singer’s predilection for lavishly kinky story-songs earned him the nickname, His Royal Badness. He is also known as the “Purple One” because of his colorful fashions. His sound was as unique and transfixing as he. He created what became known as Minneapolis sound which was a funky blend of pop, synth and new wave.

Controversy followed the singer and that, in part, made his fans adore him more. “Darling Nikki,” a song that details a one-night stand, prompted the formation of the Parents Music Resource Center. Led by Al Gore’s then wife, Tipper, the group encouraged record labels to place advisory labels on albums with explicit lyrics.

He left his imprint on so many aspects of popular culture from film to movies to sports to politics. As the Minnesota Vikings prepped to take on the New Orleans Saints in the 2010 NFC championship game, Prince wrote a fight song entitled “Purple and Gold” to inspire his home team. The Vikings lost. He was the half-time performer at the Super Bowl in 2007.

Last year while addressing the unrest following the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody in Baltimore, Prince released the song “Baltimore.” He performed at a benefit concert in the city and gave a portion of the proceeds to youth groups in Baltimore.

CNN’s AnneClaire Stapleton contributed to this report. Read the full article here – http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/21/entertainment/prince-estate-death/

Reprint from the Washington Post –
By Elahe Izadi and Peter Holley
April 21 at 2:13 PM 

Legendary musician Prince, 57, died Thursday morning at his suburban Minnesota compound, his publicist confirmed.

“It is with profound sadness that I am confirming that the legendary, iconic performer, Prince Rogers Nelson, has died at his Paisley Park residence this morning at the age of 57,” the pop icon’s publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, said in a statement. “There are no further details as to the cause of death at this time.”

The Carver County’s Sheriff’s Office had confirmed earlier that it was investigating a death at Prince’s Paisley Park complex in Minnesota. The sheriff’s office hasn’t release details about the identity of the person who died or the circumstances surrounding the death.

Prince — a singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and occasional actor — was one of the most popular and influential recording artists of his era. His epochal 1984 album, “Purple Rain,” featuring a string of hit singles including “When Doves Cry” and “Let’s Go Crazy,” sold more than 13 million copies, according to the Recording Industry Association of America, and is regarded as one of the greatest recordings of the decade.

“Perhaps more than any other artist, Prince called the tune for pop music in the Eighties,” Rolling Stone declared.

The Minnesota native was inducted in 2004 into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which noted that when Prince first arrived on the scene in the 1970s, “it didn’t take long for him to upend the music world with his startling music and arresting demeanor. He rewrote the rulebook, forging a synthesis of black funk and white rock that served as a blueprint for cutting-edge music in the Eighties.”

“Prince made dance music that rocked and rock music that had a bristling, funky backbone. From the beginning, Prince and his music were androgynous, sly, sexy and provocative. His colorful image and revolutionary music made Prince a figure comparable in paradigm-shifting impact to Little Richard, James Brown, Jimi Hendrix and George Clinton.”

Deputies first arrived at his Paisley Park compound at 9:43 a.m. local time, responding to a medical situation, Carver County Sheriff Chief Deputy Jason Kamerud told CBS Minnesota.

Prince was hospitalized last week. His private plane reportedly made an emergency landing in Illinois following concerts in Georgia.

TMZ says Prince’s private plane was forced to make an emergency landing on in Moline, Ill., on April 15 after the singer fell ill from the flu mid-flight. Days later, he has been found dead at his home on suburban Minneapolis. (Reuters)

The music legend held a party at Paisley Park on Saturday. He posted a photo early Sunday morning showing a scene from the compound in Chanhassen.

In a statement, Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman — former members of Prince’s band, the Revolution — said they were “completely shocked and devestated [sic] by the sudden loss of our brother, artist and friend, Prince. … We offer our love, support, and condolences to our extended family, friends and all fans of our sweet Prince.”

Recording Academy President Neil Portnow referred to Prince as “one of the most uniquely gifted artists of all time” in a statement Thursday.

“Never one to conform, he redefined and forever changed our musical landscape,” Portnow said. “Prince was an original who influenced so many, and his legacy will live on forever. We have lost a true innovator and our sincerest condolences go out to his family, friends, collaborators, and all who have been impacted by his incredible work.”

Despite his iconic public persona, Prince was known for being a deeply private individual.

When speaking to journalists, The Post reported in a 2004 profile, Prince forbid his voice from being recorded and refused to answer questions about his private life.

He enjoyed massive success, but his personal life was marked by trauma: the 1996 death of his one-week-old son from a rare bone disease; a subsequent divorce from his first wife, a former backup dancer named Mayte Garcia; the passing of both of his parents. Prince never wanted to discuss any of it.

Even in 2004, after nearly two decades in the public spotlight, the musician was keenly aware that he’d reached pinnacles that would be difficult to continue topping.

“Once you’ve done anything, to do it again ain’t no big deal, you feel me?” Prince told The Post. “I was on the cover of Rolling Stone with Vanity, I was on the cover of Rolling Stone when I didn’t even do an interview, when I wouldn’t talk to them. Once you’ve done something like that it’s like, okay, what’s the next thing?”

“Times were different back then,” Prince explained. “I wouldn’t stand out today if I was brand-new and came like that. But see, back then nobody else was doing that, and I knew that would get me over. I didn’t dress like anybody, I didn’t look like anybody, I didn’t sound like anybody. We still try to do that. Why do what everybody else is doing?

“Bowie and Madonna, even if it wasn’t good, we still talk about it because it was something new. That’s a beautiful word.”

Musicians who worked with Prince came away stunned by his near-maniacal work ethic and rare energy. He was known for only needing about three hours of sleep a night. After finishing multi-hour shows on tour, he would peel off to a local club and continue playing until nearly dawn. It’s one reason, he told reporters, that he handled so many of the instruments on so many of his albums — he’s the only guy up at 5 a.m. recording.

“The curse part of it is that it physically drains you,” Prince told The Post in 2004, “when you try to do everything that comes into your head. Like right now, I could write a song. If I go over there,” he said, gesturing toward the instruments, “and start noodling around, I’ll write a song. Because I hear stuff all the time. I can make something out of nothing.”

Read the article here – https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/04/21/authorities-investigating-death-at-princes-paisley-park/

 

 

 

More history about Prince
Reprint from Wiki

Born Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016), known by his mononym Prince, was an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and actor, serving as a major figure in popular music for over three decades. Prince was renowned as an innovator and was widely known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, and wide vocal range. He was widely regarded as the pioneer of Minneapolis sound. His music combined rock, R&B, soul, funk, hip hop, disco, psychedelia, jazz, and pop.

Prince was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and developed an interest in music at an early age, writing his first song at age seven. After recording songs with his cousin’s band 94 East, 19-year-old Prince recorded several unsuccessful demo tapes before releasing his debut album For You in 1978, under the guidance of manager Owen Husney. His 1979 album Prince went platinum due to the success of the singles “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover”. His next three records—Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982)—continued his success, showcasing Prince’s trademark of prominently sexual lyrics and incorporation of elements of funk, dance, and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as The Revolution and released Purple Rain, which served as the soundtrack to his film debut of the same name. A prolific songwriter, Prince in the 1980s wrote songs for and produced work by many other acts, often under pseudonyms.

After releasing the albums Around the World in a Day (1985) and Parade (1986), The Revolution disbanded and Prince released the critically acclaimed double album Sign “O” the Times (1987) as a solo artist. He released three more solo albums before debuting The New Power Generation band in 1991. He changed his stage name in 1993 to an unpronounceable symbol (Prince logo.svg), also known as the “Love Symbol”. He then began releasing new albums at a faster pace to remove himself from contractual obligations to Warner Bros.; he released five records between 1994 and 1996 before signing with Arista Records in 1998. In 2000, he began referring to himself as “Prince” again. He has released 15 albums since then, including his latest, HITnRUN Phase One, which was first released exclusively on the Tidal streaming service on September 7, 2015 before being released on CD on September 15, 2015 by NPG Records.

Prince has sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. He has won seven Grammy Awards,[10] a Golden Globe, and an Academy Award. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the first year of his eligibility. Rolling Stone has ranked Prince at number 27 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

He died at his Paisley Park recording studio and home in Chanhassen, Minnesota, near Minneapolis, on April 21, 2016, after suffering flu-like symptoms for several weeks.

Read the full wiki article here – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_(musician)

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